The Library of Celsus in ancient Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

Visiting Ephesus in One Day: Exploring a Biblical City’s Ruins

On our road trip through Turkey, we both wanted to stop and spend one day in Ephesus. We did not expect it to be much, but we wanted to see the ruins of the Biblical city where Paul once walked. The ruins of the ancient city of Ephesus surprised me. The ruins are impressive and worth the visit.

Exploring the ruins of Ephesus, located just outside of Selçuk in Turkey, did not take long. You can easily see them in a few hours without a tour. If you are visiting Ephesus for the first time, here is everything you need to know about the ancient city and its ruins.

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The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the ruins in Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

What to See in Ancient Ephesus

All in all, we spent about 3 – 4 hours exploring the ruins of ancient Ephesus. We would have spent less time, but they did not kick us out at closing time because of an evening event taking place. We felt that was a good amount of time to wander the city from the bottom of the hill to the top and back again. These were our favorite stops along the way.

Library of Celsus

The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the Ephesus ruins. It is a must see and you can’t miss it on the road through ancient Ephesus. The Library of Celsus is the third largest library in the ancient world. It was built to hold 12,000 scrolls and completed in 114 – 117 A.D. Built by his son to honor him, Senator Celsus is buried in a mausoleum underneath the library. The facade lay in ruins for years before being put back together again between 1970 and 1978.

After I saw pictures of it online, I knew I wanted to see it but that it would be crowded. Since we went in the afternoon, we decided to make it our last stop, hoping the tours would leave by then. It worked!

While we did make it our last stop, we also stumbled upon it earlier. As we wandered through the ruins on the main path, I noticed a decent amount of people around taking pictures of something. I looked over, and there it was. At first, it was smaller than I expected. From the road, you walk down a path to get to the bottom of the library. When we came back later and walked down, it looked more like the size I expected. At first, I thought that it must be a similar building instead of the real thing.

The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the ruins in Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

The Library of Celsus about an hour and a half before closing. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
The first time we walked past the Library of Celsus

Because the Library of Celsus is the main stop in Ephesus, it is also one of the more crowded spots. If you want to get photos without anyone in them, get there when it opens and go straight to the Library. Do not stop anywhere along the way as you can go back later. If you are like us and visit in the afternoon, make it your last stop. There will probably still be a few other people there, but you can use creative angles to crop them out or take turns taking photos. We ended up waiting for the last family to finish their photos before we took our photos.

Because we were the only ones left, we set up the tripod to take a picture of us. It was right at closing time, and a security guard walking by came over to us. We assumed it would be to tell us to leave. It was not. He just let us know that we could not use the tripod to take pictures for security reasons and then left us alone. We respected the rule even though there was no one else around to take pictures of us. We ended up setting the camera on a rock instead. If you are traveling alone, have a plan to get pictures of yourself that does not involve a tripod.

The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the ruins in Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
Sunset at the Library of Celsus

The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the ruins in Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. The area around the Library of Celsus in Ephesus is just as impressive as the ruins itself. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

Curetes Street

Curetes Street is one of the main streets through Ephesus. It connects the upper part of Ephesus to the lower part of Ephesus. Many of the main stops throughout the ruins are along Curetes Street. The street leads from the Library of Celsus up through a main street that was full of shops in ancient times.

This street is made of marble, and parts of it were a bit slick. While avoiding these areas and finding steady footing is not difficult, be aware of the slippery patches, especially if it is wet. You can see the parts of the street that have been smoothed out and have become slippery from years of use.

Looking down Curetes Street in Ephesus towards the Library of Celsus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. Walking down Curetes Street in Ephesus towards the Library of Celsus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

Terrace Houses

The Terrace Houses in Ephesus are an extra fee of 30 TL (about $5). It is worth the fee. If you visit in the summer like we did, it is worth it even more because you get a break in the air conditioning and shade for a while. The area opens at the same time as the ruins but closes 30 minutes beforehand.

The Terrace Houses are the homes where the wealthy lived in ancient Ephesus. The houses were used from the first to seventh century A.D. Inside the closed in area, you find six homes full of mosaics and walls that tell the stories of ancient myths.

While inside, you follow a walkway through the different levels of the homes. When we visited, we were the only ones inside. We took our time, enjoying the air conditioning and imagining what life was like for these families. The work that went into these homes is incredible. The mosaics and painted walls show the wealth these families had. There are signs along the way to point out things or explain things for visitors. If you are visiting with a tour, you will have to see if the tour includes the Terrace Houses or not.

The terrace houses in Ephesus have an extra fee but are worth the cost. You can see several of the homes of the wealthy and image how they lived in ancient times. ind a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. The terrace houses in Ephesus have an extra fee but are worth the cost. You can see several of the homes of the wealthy and image how they lived in ancient times. ind a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. The terrace houses in Ephesus have an extra fee but are worth the cost. You can see several of the homes of the wealthy and image how they lived in ancient times. ind a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

The Great Theater & The Odeon Theater

These two theaters in Ephesus are at opposite ends of the ruins. If you enter from the lower entrance, the Great Theater is the first one you see. If you enter from the upper entrance, you first come across the Odeon Theater. The Great Theater is the more crowded of the two, at least when we went. It is also the bigger of the two by far.

The Great Theater of Ephesus

If you walk the main roads through the entire ruins, both theaters are on your route. Take time to explore the Great Theater, the biggest ancient theater in Turkey. It seats 24,000 people. Built back in the 4th century BC, it was a Greek theater that later became a Roman theater.

For Christians or those interested in history, the Great Theater is where the events of Acts 19:23 – 41 took place. A silversmith by the name of Demetrius started a riot against Paul for speaking out against Artemis (Diana). The Temple of Artemis is nearby and one of the Ancient Wonders of the World. Because Paul spoke out against worshiping her, the silversmiths worried they would lose income for their silver shrines sold to visitors. They took Paul’s companions into the theater, but the apostles pleaded with Paul not to go. Eventually, a city clerk dispelled the crowd, encouraging them to take their problems to the legal system instead of a public assembly as the men had committed no crime.

There was a concert in the Great Theater on the day we visited. It was a special event being held that night. Because off that, we were not asked to leave at closing time. I am not sure if they are as lax about closing time when there is not an event, but it worked out well for us.

The Grand Theater in Ephesus where Paul's letter to the Ephesians was read. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. The Grand Theater in Ephesus seats 24,000 people. Concerts are still performed there. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

The Odeon Theater

Unlike the Great Theater which began as a Greek theater, the Odeon Theater was built by the Romans. It seats 1,400 people, so it is much smaller than the Great Theater. Before it was excavated, the entire theater was underground. It is also less crowded than the Great Theater, making it a good photo spot.

The well-preserved Odeon Theater in Ephesus holds 1,400 people. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. Sitting in the Odeon Theater in Epheus takes you back in time. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

Temple of Hadrian

The Temple of Hadrian sits across the street from the Terrace Houses. Built in the second century, the temple honors the Roman emperor Hadrian. Later it became a Christian church. This impressive structure was restored more recently and is along the main path. This makes it an easy stop as you wander through Ephesus.

Practical Information for Visiting Ephesus

Ephesus is popular for tours, but it is still easy to visit on your own. For our road trip through Turkey, we visited Ephesus after coming from Istanbul. From Ephesus, we continued our road trip to the thermal baths at Pamukkale and then to experience the fairy chimneys and hot air balloon sunrises of Cappadocia.

Opening Hours & Ticket Prices

The ruins of Ephesus open at 8 a.m. all year long. In the summer months, from April to October, the ruins close at 7 p.m. The rest of the year, from November to March, they close a little earlier at 5 p.m. The night we were there, there was a concert in the Great Theater. We ended up staying until 7:30 or 7:45, and no one asked us to leave. We planned to be out by 7, but since it was empty and no one was asking us to leave, we kept taking pictures as we slowly made our way out. There was a tour group there for the concert and security walking around, but that was it.

The cost to enter the ruins is 60 TL (Turkish Lira) or about $10. If you choose to visit the Terrace Houses, the price is an additional 30 TL or about $5. Children under 12 are free except in the Terrace Houses where only children under 6 are free. There is a Museum Pass if you are planning to visit multiple museums or historical sites in western Turkey. The cost is 185 TL (or about $32), and you purchase the pass at the entrance to the museums or historical sites.

One of the archways near the Odeon Theater in the ruins of Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
Archway near the Odeon Theater

The Two Entrances & What To Avoid

There are two entrances to Ephesus. There is a lower entrance and upper entrance. The lower entrance has a huge parking lot that was mostly empty. There were a few tour buses. When we walked through the ancient streets to the top of the ruins, we found the second entrance. I’m not sure if cars can park up there or if it is just for tours as we did not walk all the way up to the actual exit to see. The entrance at the top does not have much going on around it. The lower entrance is the main entrance with shops, bathrooms and food available.

Because the lower entrance is more popular, the upper part of Ephesus is less crowded. The crowds mainly stay between the Great Theater and the Library of Celsus. They wander out from there a little bit, but the upper area of the ruins near the top entrance is not as crowded. This includes the area around the Odeon Theater.

A view of ancient Ephesus and the surrounding areas from the Terrace Houses. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
View of Ancient Ephesus and the surrounding area

We parked at the lower entrance. As soon as we exited the car, a man approached us. He offered us a ride to the top in a buggy with a horse or donkey pulling it. The price was cheap, and his selling point was that it was 1600 meters. At first it sounded like it might be a tough walk, and he tried to convince us it was. He told us it was all uphill and kept telling us it was 1600 meters. Being American, I think he assumed we would not know how far 1600 meters was. Being a runner, I knew it was about a mile.

We opted not to take him up on his offer. We did not regret it one bit. The roads are flat in some areas and gradually slope upwards in others. You are not climbing a mountain. It has some sections that are more uphill than others, but it is not strenuous. Because it is not a race to the top, it makes it easy to stop and take breaks. Honestly, you will probably stop a lot along the way and take some detours to check out other things as well. Thanks to frequent stops and taking in the ruins, the uphill is not so bad (and we are flatlanders).

If you are worried about the walk to the top, know this is an option. If you take the ride to the top, you walk back down to the bottom and pass the sites once. We liked walking to the top and back because it gave us two chances to see everything.

Two columns still standing in ancient Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
Columns near the Library of Celsus

Tripods Not Allowed

We learned the hard way that tripods are not allowed. We set up once everyone left to get a picture together, and then a security guard came over to let us know about the rule. Since no one else was around, we ended up using a rock as a tripod to get a picture of us. If you are a solo traveler or a travel couple who wants pictures together, be aware that you will not be able to use your tripod. When other people were around, we took turns taking pictures for each other. If people were not around, we took selfies or set the camera on rocks.

The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the ruins in Ephesus. Tripods are not allowed here, so be prepared to use rocks or ask other people to take your picture. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
How we found out that tripods are not allowed

When to Visit Ephesus & What to Wear

Ephesus gets quite hot in the summer. We went on a summer afternoon in June, and it was warm. The temperature was in the lower 80s (about 27C), but there was no shade and little breeze. In the winter, the temperature drops to the 40s and 50s (average of 9 – 12C).

For the summer, we wore shorts and t-shirts and were happy with our decision. In the winter, plan to bundle up more depending on your tolerance for the cold. No matter when you go, wear comfortable shoes. Wearing shoes with a good grip helps in areas where the marble is slippery. I wore my flip flops, and they were comfortable but had no traction on the marble.

The Grand Theater in Ephesus seats 24,000 people. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
The Grand Theater

How to Get to Ephesus & Where to Stay

We drove to Ephesus from Istanbul. The drive from Istanbul to Ephesus took about 5.5 hours, but we stopped partway and stayed at Onhann Hotel in Balikesir and enjoyed our room and breakfast there. This area was about 2.5 hours away from the ruins. There are quite a few hotel options much closer to Ephesus in nearby Selçuk too.

From Ephesus, we continued on to the thermal pools in Pamukkale. The thermal pools are about 2.5 hours from Ephesus and are worth the visit. If you are staying near Pamukkale, a day trip to Ephesus would be perfect.

Many people who visit Ephesus come from Kusadasi. Kusadasi is a coastal city and cruise port, making it a popular tourist destination. Many day tours come from Kusadasi, and Ephesus makes for a popular cruise excursion. If you visit this way, I would hire a taxi for the day, but that is just because we try to avoid tours. If you enjoy tours, there are many available.

While you are in Ephesus, make sure to eat at Agora Restaurant. It is right next to the museum (not the ruins), and the food is delicious. We enjoyed sitting outside in the shade and relaxing there before exploring the ruins for the rest of the day.

A cat begs for food at Agoda Restaurant in Selcuk near Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

Other Things to Do in Ephesus & Selçuk

Besides the ruins of Ephesus, there are several other options for a trip to the Ephesus and Selçuk area. There are museums to visit including the Ephesus Archaeological Museum which houses many of the items found in the excavation of Ephesus. Besides the ruins and museum, here are some of the other top stops in Ephesus.

Temple of Artemis

This was our first stop in Ephesus. While there is not much left, the Temple of Artemis is one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. There was no one else there when we went except for an older gentleman selling postcards in the parking lot. Only one pillar out of the original 127 remains standing. It only takes a few minutes to see it, and it is not too far off the beaten path.

For Christians or history fans, this is the temple that Paul spoke out against in Acts. When he spoke out against this temple, some of the silversmiths started a little riot against him. They sold silver shrines to visitors from all over who came to worship Artemis (Diana) and worried it would hurt their bottom line.

One column is all that remains of the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
The Temple of Artemis

The Basilica of St. John

The entry fee for the Basilica of St. John is 15 TL (about $2.50). It opens at 8 a.m. all year. It closes at 7 p.m. from April to October and at 5 p.m. from November to March. Built in the 6th century, it is believed to be built over the burial site of John the Apostle. We did not visit due to staying at Ephesus until it closed.

It is believed that John went to Ephesus in the later years of his life and took Mary, the mother of Jesus, with him. While there, he wrote the books of the Bible attributed to him other than Revelation. He lived here, was sentenced to exile on Patmos (where he wrote Revelation) and then returned when he was pardoned. He lived out the rest of his life preaching here according to early church sources and died here. There was a church built on this site before this to honor the apostle. However, it was torn down for the basilica to be built.

If you choose to visit the Selçuk Castle, you enter through the Basilica of St. John. We saw it from the Temple of Artemis, but there are mixed reviews on whether it is worth the climb or not.

The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the ruins in Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
The area near the Library of Celsus

Cave of the Seven Sleepers

This is a popular spot due to the story attached to it. According to the story, seven young men hid in a cave to escape religious prosecution. They fell asleep and emerged from the cave 300 years later. The story gained traction when an early bishop spread the tale. The story also appears in the Qur’an. Many tourists still visit this site, but we did not.

House of the Virgin Mary

We also skipped this one, but the house where Mary, the mother of Jesus, lived out the rest of her life is believed to be here as well. Because Jesus told John to take care of his mother, many believe he took her to Ephesus with him. It is now a Catholic shrine and a popular stop in Ephesus. The cost to visit is 35 TL ($6). The area opens at 8 a.m. all year. It closes at 6 p.m. from March to October and at 5 p.m. from November to February.

Walking into the Odeon Theater in Ephesus through an archway. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
The area near the Odeon Theater
Exploring the ancient city of Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.
Near the lower entrance to the ruins in Ephesus

*****

Visiting Ephesus for a day trip is a perfect stop for anyone who enjoys history and ancient ruins. The ruins only take a few hours to see, and then you can continue your trip through Turkey. What are some other ancient ruins outside of Rome and Athens that are must see ruins?

Looking for more Turkey tips? Check out our posts with our full road trip itinerary as well as our posts on visiting Cappadocia and spending a day in Pamukkale.

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The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the ruins in Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. Wandering the streets of Ephesus and seeing the Library of Celsus is not to be missed when visiting Turkey. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. The main street through Ephesus where all the shops once stood. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here. The Library of Celsus is the highlight of the ruins in Ephesus. Find a full one day itinerary with everything you need to know about visiting the ancient ruins of Ephesus in Turkey here.

 

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69 Comments

    1. Great post and beautiful photos as always! I’ve only visited Istanbul in Turkey but you are convincing me I need to go back and see more! Thanks for sharing!

      1. Thank you so much! I did not expect to like Turkey as much as I did. I had no idea the landscape was so varied and that there were so many beautiful sites there before we went.

    1. Oh! Looking at a map, I see that I have been like half an hour away from there, but totally missed it! Thats a shame, I would have loved to see that. It looks really beautiful 🙂

      1. It can always be a reason to go back to Turkey 🙂

    1. What a difference time of day makes. When I walked down Curetes Street it was practically shoulder to shoulder people. Ephesus. There was no angle I could shoot at to get rid of them. Fabulous photos of one of my favourite places.

      1. Thank you! I think it helped that many of the tours left or were down at the Library of Celsus or Grand Theater. It was pretty crowded when we first arrived around 3:30 or 4:00, but it emptied out a lot more other than those two spots by about 6:00. I can imagine it gets pretty crowded at times though!

    1. I was there!! But you definitely managed to capture in on photos way better than me:)
      Such a pretty and informative post. Thanks for sharing:)

      1. Thank you! It really is a neat place to see and explore. I hope you enjoyed it!

        1. Beautiful photos. I especially love the one with the sun coming through the windows!

          1. Thank you so much! It definitely made for a pretty sunset with the sun behind the library.

    1. Thank you Christine, I really enjoyed reading your blog on Ephesus as I was there about 10 years ago. It took me back to that day and how much I enjoyed seeing the ruins and learning more about the city. Turkey has many Bibical sites, so glad I got to visit many of them.

      1. I would love to go back and visit more of them. I didn’t realize how many there were until we went. Miss you and hope you are doing well!

    1. I loved Ephesus soooooo much when I went – but it was boiling haha. Your photos are stunning, too. Really helpful post for anyone planning a visit to Ephesus x

      1. Thank you so much! It was warm when we went, but not too bad. We went in early June, so the heat was just starting to kick in. It may help that we are from Florida and used to the heat and humidity 🙂

    1. Wow, traveling through your eyes and facts of the city of Ephesus gave me the excitement of someday wanting to visit.

      1. Thank you! That means a lot. I hope you are enjoying your summer!

    1. What a thorough and thought blog! I’ve visited here as part of our trip to Turkey many years ago. It’s great to read your perspective and insights. Lovely photos.

    1. Wow – I did not expect Turkey to have ruins like this! Your sunset photo is so beautiful (as are all the photos)

      1. Thank you so much! It looks like something you would expect in Greece or Rome for sure.

    1. I got goosebumps reading this. Thanks for including descriptions of the parts of the Bible that took place there – it really made me realise just how special this place is, now I’m dying to visit! Glad I found your blog before going to Turkey as this is the first time I’ve heard of this place and I love visiting Christian sites. It’s wonderful to see that there’s much more left of the building than many other ruins I’ve been to such as the ones on Delos island in Greece.

      1. I love visiting Bible sites too! I like to dig in and read what happened there when we are there. There are a ton of Biblical cities in Turkey, so you may want to see if there are others you want to visit too.

    1. Those ruins are impressive for sure. Lots of interesting ruins in England. I think my favorite might be Fountains Abbey.

      1. I haven’t seen that one yet. I spent a month in England when I was 12 or 13, but since then I’ve only been back to London for short stays. I’d love to come do a road trip again and see places like Fountains Abbey.

    1. This has been on my bucket list for so long! Would love to plan a trip around Turkey and see this along with Cappadocia and a few other spots. Your photos are gorgeous!

      1. I hope you can one day soon! Turkey really impressed me with all the beautiful places that are there.

    1. What a magnificent site. I didn’t have enough time to visit Ephesus on my trip to Turkey, so I am very keen to go back. I often wish we would develop the kind of technology that could put a hologram over the ruins of what the structures looked like during their glory days. You would walk on the ancient stones and see the projection of the library full of books on the floor to ceiling bookshelves, burning torches along the walls…. That would be so cool.

      1. That would be cool for sure! I would love to be able to see what the area looked like in its prime, with people doing their daily business and the buildings sparkling and new. At least we have the ruins to enjoy still though!

    1. Ephesus is magnificent. I didn’t get to it the first time I visited Turkey by made I did the second. I well remember the mosaics in the Terrace Houses. Reading your post brought back great memories of the morning I spent there. I love your photos. They are are very good. I will have to see at mine again.

      1. The mosaics were truly impressive with the detail and intricacy of the designs. Thank you so much for sharing about your experience!

    1. This is an amazing post, and I love your pictures! I had never heard of Ephesus in Turkey but I will definitely add it to my list of places to go to. It’s incredible there is so much history here, and the ruins look well-preserved!

      1. The ruins really are in pretty good shape although some things have been put back together like the Library of Celsus. I hope you get a chance to visit sometime!

    1. I literally have never even heard of this place! I’m planning to visit Turkey next year, so I’m definitely adding this stop to the itinerary!

    1. I hadn’t heard of Ephesus until now. It looks quite interesting. I tend to be drawn towards places with rich history and marvelous architecture. Ephesus checks all those boxes.

      1. It definitely does. For how much I was not a history person in school, I love visiting historical places.

        1. The pics look so great and the place looks with Petra! I heard about it at museum in Vienna but I didn’t k know there is a real place!

          1. It’s really neat there! We haven’t been to Petra but hope to go soon!

    1. What a stunning place! I had never heard of Ephesus before. Thank you for this blog post and great tips. Always good to know when you can’t use a tripod.

      1. Thank you! I agree – always makes it a little more challenging to get photos together or by yourself if traveling solo. I understand why some places make the rule though.

    1. I didn’t make it to Ephesus my last time Turkey and been wanting to ever since! I can’t wait to come back ????

      1. Turkey has so much to see! We would love to go back and see it again one day to hit more places.

      1. Thank you! The theater was huge! I like that they still do concerts and event there too.

    1. Ancient History was my all time favorite subject in high school {many years ago} so seeing the ruins of Ephesus in Turkey would be amazing. How strange about the tripod rule – was there a reason for it?
      Such beautiful photos of the ancient city and the ruins, can’t even begin to imagine the amount of work that went into all fo those gorgeous buildings, shame they are not restored.

      1. I was not a history person in school, but now I love visiting historical places 🙂 The man didn’t give a reason. The two common ones are that they don’t want commercial photo shoots happening and for security reasons since it blocks up traffic. Usually that area is extremely crowded as the Library of Celsus is the most popular spot in the ruins, so I’m guessing it has to do with that. We always try to be respectful of the place when we use it – making sure it is out of the way and not setting it up for long.

    1. Always fascinating to look at ruins and imagine what life must have been like in those times!

      1. Yes! I completely agree. Love thinking about what it would have been like to live there and see the buildings sparkling and new.

    1. The colors of your photos are incredible! I actually went to Ephesus a few months ago and haven’t even dug through the photos yet but I can’t imagine they look even half as good as yours! Great, useful post!

      1. Thank you so much! We went a year ago, so it took me some time to dig into them too. I’m always behind on posting!

    1. What a wonderfully detailed guide to Ephesus! I visited with my parents on a family holiday but as I was around 15 years old I didn’t appreciate it at ALL – and I really regret it now! Thanks for reminding me of how beautiful this place is 🙂

      1. Thank you! I know what you mean. There are a few places I went as a kid that I would see totally differently now as an adult.

    1. What a great article. It sparks the desire to visit there. You’re a great guide and appreciate your posts.

    1. […] Once we arrived in Ephesus, finding food was our first order of business. We ate outside near the ruins at Agora Restaurant and enjoyed relaxing while we ate. Our next stop was the Temple of Artemis, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Finally, we made it to the ruins of the Biblical city of Ephesus around 3:30 or 4:00 p.m. (find our full one day guide to Ephesus here). […]

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